Careers

School of Creative Industries  

CUPE LOCAL 3904, UNIT 1 POSTINGS

TERMS - FALL 2017 & WINTER 2018

All appointments are contingent on student enrolment and/or budgetary constraints.

 

Posting Date: May 1st 2017

Deadline to apply: May 15th 2017

Please submit your application online through the careers page here: https://careers.ryerson.ca
Only applications submitted online can accepted.

 

Courses Available Fall 2017 (August 23rd to December 31st)

Course No.

Course Name

Approx Size

Sections

Hours

Total

 CRI 300  Digital Design Studio  32  7  3hrs  21hrs
 CRI 510  Art and Business of Gaming  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 530  Talent Management  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 540  Marketing the Creative Industries  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 550  The Book in Canada  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 560  Topics in Creative Industries - Fall 2017 Topic: The Music Industry  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 620  Concert and Festival Management  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 710  Creative Industries Research Methodology  90  2  3hrs  6hrs
 CRI 820  Global Licensing/Distribution Agreements  45  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 850  Directed Reading (Saturday)  30  1  1hr  1hr
         Total hrs  49hrs

 

Courses Available Winter 2018 (January 1st to May 8th)

Course No.

Course Name

Approx Size

Sections

Hours

Total

 CRI 420  From Writer to Reader  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 530  Talent Management  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 540  Marketing the Creative Industries  45  2  3hrs  6hrs
 CRI 560  Topics in Creative Industries - Winter 2018 Topic: Celebrity  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 620  Concert and Festival Management  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 630  Advertising Theory and Practice  90  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 720  Media Regulation and Communication Policy  60  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 800  Managing Creative Industries  20  7  3hrs  21hrs
 CRI 810  Studies in Creative Collaboration  35  4  3hrs  12hrs
 CRI 820  Global Licensing/Distribution Agreements  45  1  3hrs  3hrs
 CRI 850  Directed Reading (Saturday)  30  1  1hr  1hr
 CRI 860  The Big Night  30  1   3hrs  3hrs
         Total hrs  67

 

Course Descriptions:

CRI 300 Digital Design Studio

Working effectively in the Creative Industries requires an understanding of media production based on sound principles of digital design. This studio course provides a project-based introduction to developing digital media content for the Web. Using industry-standard software and production practices, students will design and produce digital content. Taking into account current media ecologies, students will learn the basics of graphic design, interaction design, audio/video production and web authoring.
Weekly Contact: Lab:3 hrs.
 

CRI 420 From Writer to Reader

This overview of the book publishing industry in Canada today will follow the path of books in Canada from creation by authors to consumption by readers, and beyond. Topics will include the identity of the Canadian writer; literary agency; the structure of the publishing house through the publishing process (acquisitions and editorial; rights management; design and production; marketing, sales, and publicity; distribution); self-publishing; the role of the media and social media; book festivals, reading circuits, and literary awards; book and device sales, both brick-and-mortar and online; libraries and the used book market; and book clubs.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 510 Art and Business of Gaming

Video games constitute one of the most dynamic and growing segments of the Creative Industries. This course explores the history, aesthetics, and cultural impact of video games while familiarizing students with the production, distribution and marketing processes that have evolved to stimulate this young industry. Issues confronting the video game industry as well as applicable developments in design and technology will be among the topics covered.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 530 Talent Management

This course examines the crucial role of professional management for all types of artists and entertainers. Instruction focuses on the roles of personal manager, booking agent, talent agent, casting agent, road manager, and company manager. Additional topics will include the organization and business practices of talent agencies, talent career development, artist unions, and terms specific to the contracting of talent.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 540 Marketing the Creative Industries

This course will be of interest to students who wish either to pursue a career in the Creative Industries or to advance their knowledge of strategic marketing in the context of a challenging, rapidly changing environment. It will examine the particular demands and techniques of marketing media products - films, TV shows, video games, books, magazines etc. - that are characterized by a short shelf life. The marketing of creative talent - the packaging and selling of celebrity artists - will be studied in the context of applicable consumption dynamics and changing global mechanisms for the promotion and distribution of creative goods.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 550 The Book in Canada

Understanding the creative landscape today requires an understanding of the forces that shaped it in the past. This course will survey the development of book publishing and retailing in Canada from early-twentieth-century importation from abroad to the advent of large-chain retail. Topics will include the development of a Canadian textbook market; the story of Harlequin; the impact of the Massey Commission; the creation of Canadian trade-only publishing, changes in "branch-plant" publishing, and the rise of small presses; and bookselling from the stationery store to the national-chain retail and the advent of Internet sales.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 560 Topics in Creative Industries

This course, the subject matter and the availability of which may change from year to year, examines specific issues, themes, trends and/or developments that have currency within the field of creative industries. Topics may be proposed by permanent faculty, guest professionals or students.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 620 Concert and Festival Management

The spectrum of live entertainment and artistic events is extensive, ranging from rock concerts, nightclubs, jazz festivals, tournaments and theme parks to ballet, opera, parades and fashion shows. This course will focus on the particular challenges involved in marketing live events, and the specific advertising, publicity, pricing and promotional techniques and related management practices that have proven successful in addressing these challenges.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 630 Advertising Theory and Practice

This course presents an overview of the advertising industry and its creative functions. It examines the interrelationship of the institutions of advertising, the advertisers, the advertising agencies and the media, and explores how advertisers are adjusting to and exploiting new digital technologies. It introduces research and details methods of determining advertising objectives, budgets, establishing target audiences, interpreting audience ratings and circulation figures. Students also gain an understanding of key ethical and legal issues particular to this creative field.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 710 Creative Industries Research Methodology

This course asks how information about the Creative Industries can be collected and analyzed. It surveys research methods that are both useful within the Creative Industries and crucial to studying them. We will review information retrieval techniques as well as methods of data collection (audience research; content analysis; critical and textual analysis; surveys; interviews; focus groups etc.). Through practical exercises we will develop the research skills that are required of many careers within the Creative Industries (grant, report and policy brief writing etc.) as well as in advanced graduate degrees.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 720 Media Regulation and Communication Policy

This course looks at the institutional and legal structures of media and communication in Canada and internationally. Drawing on texts and perspectives from important thinkers and analysts such as Lawrence Lessig, Marc Raboy, Peter Grant, and Robert McChesny, we will examine the policy frameworks that shape broadcasting, print, digital and internet, music and more. We will also consider various crosscutting communication policy issues such as copyright, production quotas and subsides and human rights. Recommended only for students in third or forth year.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 800 Managing Creative Enterprises

This capstone course builds upon the required B.A. Creative Industries industrial work placement, which must be completed prior to the end of this course. Using the research conducted during their placement, students will undertake a report that analyzes the management systems of their workplace company, assesses its strategic directions, and evaluates its strengths and weaknesses relative to the industrial environment in which it is operating. Course content is designed to facilitate the report by focusing on the organization, operation and strategic planning of creative enterprises and the criteria for appraising their efficacy.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 810 Studies in Creative Collaboration

The image of the solitary artist toiling away in romantic isolation has given way to the contemporary reality of creative production in many fields that builds upon multidisciplinary expertise on the part of a diverse team to achieve an end product arising from consensus-building and collaboration at many steps in the process. Applying theories of organizational behaviour, this course uses case studies and role-playing techniques to examine and familiarize students with best practices in collaborative creative work.
Weekly Contact: Lab:3 hrs.
 

CRI 820 Global Licensing/Distribution Agreements

Content creators must have the ability to market and exploit their intellectual property, both in Canada and internationally. In this practical course, legal issues and key contractual in distribution and licensing of intellectual property matters are examined in both Canadian and international contexts. Various contracts involving the exploitation of creative content will be examined, including license agreements, distribution agreements, asset and share purchases, joint ventures, and the legal rights and remedies which flow from these agreements.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 830 Youth Cultural Production

In the 21st century, youth are driving creative innovation through emerging trends in consumption of creative content and though the rise of youth as creative producers. This course maps these trends in youth creative consumption and cultural production and investigates how policy structures might best support these unfolding creative and economic directions.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.
 

CRI 850 Directed Reading Course

This directed reading course is intended to permit the student to survey a coherent body of literature in an area of study related to the student's program objectives.
Weekly Contact: Tutorial:1 hr.
 

CRI 860 The Big Night

Teams of students propose, budget, finance, market and execute an ambitious event open to the public in a creative industry. Possible events include a film, dance or music festival, theatrical production, record or graphic novel launch or gallery exhibit. With faculty guidance and mentor support, students work with outside artists and content creators and provide a substantive report on the event's impact.
Weekly Contact: Lecture:3 hrs.

 

Unique among North American universities, Ryerson’s Creative Industries program studies the creative fields from the perspective of enterprise development, creative innovation and entrepreneurship to prepare students for today’s creative economy. The School provides teaching and research expertise focusing on communication, media and the performing arts and works closely with professional groups in Toronto, Canada’s cultural and business center.

Ryerson is Canada's leader in innovative, career-focused education and a university clearly on the move. It is a distinctly urban university with a focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. Ryerson has a mission to serve societal need and a long-standing commitment to engaging its community.

Guided by a bold Academic Plan, an ambitious research agenda, and a Master Plan to revitalize the campus and surrounding neighbourhood, Ryerson is the most applied-to university in Ontario relative to available spaces, and its reputation with business and community leaders continues to rise.

Ryerson is reshaping the downtown core of Toronto with three new buildings: the Mattamy Athletic Centre at the Gardens, the Ryerson Image Centre in the heart of campus, and a Student Learning Centre on Yonge Street. In addition, currently in progress is the development of a new multipurpose building, the Church Street development (CSD). This new building will be located just north of Dundas on Church Street and will be home to four academic health services programs, Ryerson food services, administration, and a student residence.

 

Ryerson University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within our community. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and its scholarship including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply but applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.